Posts Tagged ‘social justice’

on leftwing hatred

December 4, 2016

It was observed frequently during the campaign that the progressive strategy of dismissing every dissent from its ideology, even mild representations like the Tea Party and Mitt Romney, as virulently evil racists had made it inevitable that the next iteration of dissent would be something rather less genteel. Thus Donald Trump, President-Elect of the United States.

This is a long piece, perhaps longer than it needs to be, but it covers a significant issue quite well, that being the role of hard-line social justice ideology in the election of Donald Trump. It could provide a Quote of the Day for at least a week. Here’s a sample:

The monster of Trumpism is in large measure a monster created by the social justice ideology and identity politics of the progressive left. The more that a demonizing and merciless ideological narrative is used as a weapon against particular demographics, the more that they will resist it. The social justice narrative calls for white people, and men in particular, to assume a crippling guilt, to be the scapegoats for America. Trump’s movement is exactly the sort of resistance that such a narrative will provoke.

White people and men refused the narrative. For all of the progressive left’s insistence upon the evilness of America on account of straight white Christian men, Trump’s movement is founded in large measure upon the counter-claim that, for all of its undeniable faults, the nation of America was once great, and it was predominantly white Christian men who made it great.

Trump is a shameless and guilt-free candidate. This is exactly the sort of candidate who will thrive in the current context. As Michael Story has observed, the progressive left so radically overused the necessary antibiotics of shame and guilt that they produced a shame and guilt resistant candidate and movement. When people appreciate that guilt and shame have been weaponized to force them into cultural dhimmitude, they will start to celebrate shamelessness and guilt-freeness.

on white privilege

December 3, 2016

It has seemed to me for awhile that a weakness of much current discourse that focuses on systemic analysis is the lack of attention to real lived lives of actual human beings. My concern is explained pretty well here:

Just as in the fight against heart disease or drunk driving, awareness only has value if it actually leads to a change in behavior, and there’s no sign that these quasi-religious renunciations of privilege have accomplished such change.

This, in turn, presents a larger problem. The discourse of this school of politics is resolutely immaterial in its language, with endless discussion of acknowledging and feeling and admitting and occupying, almost none of which amounts to what anyone might consider doing.
h/t Alastair Roberts

on what might have been

June 7, 2016

I’m reminded of another aspect of the Tea Party that reflects an opportunity lost by some on the Left. There is a good case to be made that the basic instincts behind the Tea Party attenders were of the sort that would have been of assistance to genuine social justice (by which I mean to exclude those using victim status to settle grievances and acquire p0wer). Don’t expect much cooperation from the ascendant groups today.

What’s the standard?

March 10, 2016

David Brooks is a powerful white male, the epitome of someone with privilege. He described Senator Ted Cruz, a powerful Hispanic male, as “oleaginous” in a column, an offensive term to use of someone of Hispanic descent. Does that qualify as a microaggression? Does it say anything about David Brooks, the New York Times, journalism as a system? Or does no one care because Ted Cruz is a conservative Senator running for President?

h/t Ann Althouse