Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

on media, persuasion, and propaganda

September 21, 2017

Nice viewpoint on the polarization of the culture, including the media, and how the reaction to the Trump administration has undermined the Leftist cultural effort to persuade people to support Leftist policy proposals.

Here’s the key takeaway from the post: “The media has gone Full Trigglypuff — and you never go Full Trigglypuff.”

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on the Pope and politics

September 18, 2017

Paul Rahe has written a scathing rebuke of both Pope Francis and the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic church for the scandal of making the church a partisan political program rather than a promoter of the gospel. That’s going to leave a mark.

Democrat party malfeasance

September 14, 2017

Anytime someone on the Left claims that extremists on the Left are the fringe, while extremists on the Right are part of the mainstream of the GOP, ask them about this from the Democrat Congressional Campaign Committee, about as official as it can get:

DEMOCRATIC PARTY SMEARS NEIL GORSUCH AS A BIGOT

h/t Powerlineblog

Quote of the day (week)

June 16, 2017

The only way to back away from this instead of falling over the precipice is for Democrats, Republicans, and the media to acknowledge that the other side really does not want you dead. But there is too much invested in believing otherwise.

Erick Erickson

how low can they go?

May 10, 2017

Anecdotes are all the rage for proving a point (see Jimmy Kimmel on healthcare), unless they prove the opposite point the leftists want to advance, in which case they’re ridiculous. Leftists find it funny when their political opponents are being treated for cancer.

on illiberalism from the left

December 8, 2016

Will Donald Trump’s presidency bring about the end of liberty and freedom in the United States? I doubt it, but that seems to be a fear of some in light of their understanding of his campaign. Is this a new and unique concern? David French suggests that in fact it brings to light the fear of some in light of their understanding of the last decade or so of federal government actions.

The tragedy of Trump is that his voters ultimately chose to fight illiberalism with their own strongman. I wish they’d chosen to fight illiberalism with constitutionalism, but a constitutional restoration will have to wait until another day (if ever). In the meantime, however, we can’t pretend that Trump’s supporters weren’t reacting to illiberalism that was very real,  very serious, and profoundly affected many American lives.

David French

on leftwing hatred

December 4, 2016

It was observed frequently during the campaign that the progressive strategy of dismissing every dissent from its ideology, even mild representations like the Tea Party and Mitt Romney, as virulently evil racists had made it inevitable that the next iteration of dissent would be something rather less genteel. Thus Donald Trump, President-Elect of the United States.

This is a long piece, perhaps longer than it needs to be, but it covers a significant issue quite well, that being the role of hard-line social justice ideology in the election of Donald Trump. It could provide a Quote of the Day for at least a week. Here’s a sample:

The monster of Trumpism is in large measure a monster created by the social justice ideology and identity politics of the progressive left. The more that a demonizing and merciless ideological narrative is used as a weapon against particular demographics, the more that they will resist it. The social justice narrative calls for white people, and men in particular, to assume a crippling guilt, to be the scapegoats for America. Trump’s movement is exactly the sort of resistance that such a narrative will provoke.

White people and men refused the narrative. For all of the progressive left’s insistence upon the evilness of America on account of straight white Christian men, Trump’s movement is founded in large measure upon the counter-claim that, for all of its undeniable faults, the nation of America was once great, and it was predominantly white Christian men who made it great.

Trump is a shameless and guilt-free candidate. This is exactly the sort of candidate who will thrive in the current context. As Michael Story has observed, the progressive left so radically overused the necessary antibiotics of shame and guilt that they produced a shame and guilt resistant candidate and movement. When people appreciate that guilt and shame have been weaponized to force them into cultural dhimmitude, they will start to celebrate shamelessness and guilt-freeness.

on presidential media access

November 30, 2016

The reaction of the press to the campaign and election of Donald Trump is still one of the most culturally prominent issues of the season. The diversification of programming available is one reason for that distinctions among people in the society are becoming more apparent. The polarization between political views in the country may well have been strengthened by the decision of much of the press to take sides with the Progressive policy advocates; in the absence of widely disseminated information that all parties could accept as a starting place for discussion, lack of understanding and distrust deepened.

One important way this has played out is in the reporting on the transition to the Trump administration. Because of social media and the internet, more and more people can quickly and easily compare the way the press reports on Trump with how they reported on Obama, and the contrast is striking, which further weakens their reliability. The reaction to Trump’s YouTube address on his transition and on Thanksgiving is an example, where his use of social media is reported as a problem in contrast to it being strategic when Obama used it.

Between 2007 and 2016, much of the press considered this a story of evolving technology and communication. But what used to be an interesting challenge that had media “scrambling to stay in the game” against an innovative, young president is now a grave threat. Somewhere in between is probably the correct assessment, and swinging between admiration and fear depending on the president doesn’t create better coverage or earn more trust from readers.

Mary Katherine Ham

on the legacy of President Obama

November 26, 2016

The transition to a new administration is currently the most prominent fascination of reporting and commentators, but alongside that there is another prominent topic during this time, the legacy of President Obama. It’s been interesting to observe the very different evaluations of the same facts about the world, whether domestic or foreign, that have been affected to various degrees by President Obama’s policies.

Conrad Black offers his (negative) assessment here. In the column he engages with the positive assessment of David Remnick, which he describes with some very vivid comparisons:

The grief-stricken elegies of Abraham Lincoln, even unto Henry Ward Beecher, the toadying chronicles of the great liberal hallelujah chorus for Franklin D. Roosevelt, and the mawkish potboilers mass-produced by the Kennedy entourage could be ransacked in vain to find a rival to the body of Mr. Remnick’s works of ultra-secular canonization in laudation of Barack Obama.

That’s a marvelous sentence.

Quote of the day

November 22, 2016

And the failure to make the gospel of Hillary into the actual book of America points to the one good thing about Trump’s victory: a willingness among ordinary people to blaspheme against saints, to reject phony saviors, and to sniff at the new secular religion of hollow progressiveness. The liberal political and media establishment offered the little people a supposedly flawless, Francis-like figure of uncommon goodness, and the little people called bullshit on it. That is epic and beautiful, even if nothing else in recent weeks has been.

Brendan O’Neill